The Topovske šupe

About Topovske šupe

The Topovske Šupe camp for Jews and Roma operated close to the very centre of Belgrade between August and November 1941. Its first prisoners were Jewish men from Banat who had been banished from that region to Belgrade with their families by the local Germans (the Volksdeutsche); they were followed by all Jewish men from Belgrade and, in the end, Roma men, also from Belgrade. All of them, with rare exceptions, were killed in mass shootings in the autumn of 1941, mainly at the site of Jabuka near Pančevo. According to the available estimates, about 5,000 Jews and 1,500 Roma passed through it.

Very little is known today about the Topovske Šupe camp.

The location of the Topovske Šupe camp is now forgotten, derelict and unknown to the general public. There is an imminent danger that the buildings which were part of the camp will be destroyed due to the announced construction of a shopping mall. After the commemorative plaque put up by the Federation of Jewish Communities of Serbia in 2018. was stolen, representatives of the Belgrade Jewish Community unveiled a new memorial plaque to commemorate the Day of Remembrance and Courage on May 2nd, 2019.

Topovske šupe today:

 

Interview with historian Milan Koljanin about the history of the Topovske šupe, before, during and after the WWII

Interview with Lucija Rajner, the daughter and granddaughter of the victim of the Topovske šupe

Interview with Asja Drača Muntean, president of the Working Group for drafting the Law on Memorial Centre “Staro Sajmiste”, Ministry of Culture of Republic of Serbia, about the new law on Memorial Centre Staro Sajmište and the current status of the Topovske šupe

Interview with Robert Sabadoš, president of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Serbia, about the importance of preservation of the Topovske šupe for the Jewish community and the culture of remembreance in Serbia

Interview with Borka Vasić, the granddaughter of Milan Vasić the victim of the Topovske šupe camp, about her family and being Roma before and during the WWII